World Trust

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Recent Posts

Addressing Unconscious Bias Tip #3: Creating New Stories

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 25, 2014

One of the strongest perpetuators of the system of racial inequity is unconscious bias. As diversity trainers and educators, it is crucial to find ways to interrupt this bias so as to pave the way for change.

Transformative learning asks adult learners to engage in critical reflection on their experiences and learned beliefs, for the purpose of deconstructing embedded assumptions about how the world works. 

At World Trust, we have found that transformative learning is the perfect pedagogy for addressing unconscious bias. In our latest series, we'll look at six elements that can be included in your diversity activities, harnessing the power of transformative learning to combat unconscious bias.

Create New Stories
Film offers a way to present a multitude of stories that can challenge both conscious and unconscious beliefs. Dialogue then allows for processing and integrating new stories with a larger community. This is a particularly strong way of combating unconscious bias. For this reason, they are the foundation of all of the work that World Trust does, and feature prominently in our Racial Equity Learning Modules.

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Diversity in the Classroom: Streaming Racial Equality Films

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 23, 2014

As the school year kicks off again, so does the perennial problem of how to include media in a syllabus.

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Topics: Diversity Training Film Selection

Addressing Unconscious Bias Tip #2: Depersonalizing Inequity

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 18, 2014

One of the strongest perpetuators of the system of racial inequity is unconscious bias. As diversity trainers and educators, it is crucial to find ways to interrupt this bias so as to pave the way for change.

Transformative learning asks adult learners to engage in critical reflection on their experiences and learned beliefs, for the purpose of deconstructing embedded assumptions about how the world works. 

At World Trust, we have found that transformative learning is the perfect pedagogy for addressing unconscious bias. In our latest series, we'll look at six elements that can be included in your diversity activities, harnessing the power of transformative learning to combat unconscious bias.

Depersonalizing Inequity: Use a systemic frame.
Framing race gives people access to a lens that allows them to see the bigger picture. At the same time, it develops a common understanding and language with which to explore inequity. This is critical for supporting analysis, as well as for participants to be able to ask the question, “What is really happening here, and why?”

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Where Are You REALLY From? and White Privilege

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 16, 2014

Anyone with an unusual (in the context in which they find themselves) name has probably had this experience a time or two. Early in a conversation, just after it moves past pleasantries, your interlocutor leans in and asks, "So - where are you from?" Involuntarily, you stiffen.

Or maybe you've been on the opposite end of the dynamic. Admiring someone's perfect skin, gorgeous hair, or polished accent, you use a word like exotic. They stiffen. Why are they upset, when you were paying them a compliment?

A Difference of Frame
Often the difficulty we encounter when trying to talk about race has to do with the lack of a shared context. In his popular column at DiversityInc, Ask the White Guy, Luke Visconti shares his thoughts on some of the cross-cultural questions it may be tough to ask (or whose answers it may be difficult to hear). This column, on the question "Where are you from?," seeks to unite the context of questioner and questioned.

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Addressing Unconscious Bias #1: Community Building

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 11, 2014

One of the strongest perpetuators of the system of racial inequity is unconscious bias. As diversity trainers and educators, it is crucial to find ways to interrupt this bias so as to pave the way for change.

Transformative learning asks adult learners to engage in critical reflection on their experiences and learned beliefs, for the purpose of deconstructing embedded assumptions about how the world works. 

At World Trust, we have found that transformative learning is the perfect pedagogy for addressing unconscious bias. In our latest series, we'll look at six elements that can be included in your diversity activities, harnessing the power of transformative learning to combat unconscious bias.

Community Building: Relationships are the pathway from fear to engagement.
Community building is a key tool in the diversity training arsenal. Recognizing common unity begins with the process of shared awareness and understanding: this solidarity can ready participants to engage in new learning.

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On White Privilege, Simply: 'Different Rules Apply'

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 9, 2014
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Topics: Talk about Race

Beyond Our Wildest Dreams: Racial Equity Learning Modules now on DVD!

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 8, 2014

We're thrilled to announce the launch of our latest product, a media-rich diversity training curriculum called Beyond Our Wildest Dreams: Racial Equity Learning Modules

"The modules couple individual learning with community growth," says Dia Penning, World Trust's Education Manager. "They support curiosity and imagination within an adaptable delivery time - from one hour to a full class curriculum, depending on your needs."

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Topics: Talk about Race

How Media Representation Feeds Unconscious Bias

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on September 2, 2014

#IfTheyGunnedMeDown - Media Representation
With news out of Ferguson, Missouri entering its fourth week now, media images have been one of the only ways that most of the country receives its information. But amid the tweets from reporters getting arrested and images of paramilitary squads of police on the streets, we were struck by this line offering another angle on the coverage:

Media treatment of black victims is often harsher than it is of whites suspected of crimes, including murder.

The #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag, trending in the early days after the unarmed Brown was shot by a police officer, examined the way media outlets’ choice of image shaped or conformed to public opinion about the slain teen, and youth of color in general. With this Huffington Post piece, the ways in which unconscious bias affects media portrayal deserve a closer look.

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Topics: Unconscious Bias

Your Call: How Should We Talk About Racism?

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on August 28, 2014
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Topics: Talk about Race

Explaining Unconscious Bias: You've Got To Be Carefully Taught

Posted by Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong on August 26, 2014

Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific was just as popular a hit as all of their musicals, several of which have been turned into films. But as this NPR piece argues, the great musical theater duo were just as successful in advocating against systemic inequity as they were at turning out great song and dance routines. Here at World Trust, we were struck by what the song "You've Got To Be Carefully Taught" exposes about unconscious bias.

How Does Bias Occur?
Implicit, or unconscious, bias can be a tough thing to pinpoint or understand in ourselves, or explain to others when they display it. These are attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that affect us on a level that is by definition outside our conscious control. Maybe you are progressive, open-minded, and as tolerant as they come - but when a young man of color in sagging pants walks toward you on the sidewalk, you clutch your purse a little tighter until he's passed you.

What's that about? And why doesn't your conscious brain match up with your unconscious behaviors? It has to do with the way the brain is wired. We'll let Rodgers and Hammerstein explain.

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Topics: System of Inequity