World Trust

Responding to a Racist Incident

Posted by World Trust Team on December 21, 2018

 

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Topics: racial justice, trauma, bias, systemic inequity, Racism, #WorldTrust, Racial Equity Learning, Responding to a Racist Incident

Different Identity-Based Privileges

Posted by Meriam Salem on December 19, 2018

What is privilege?*

When people hear they belong to a privileged group or benefit from something like "race privilege" or "gender privilege," they don't get it, or they feel angry and defensive about what they do get. Privilege has become one of those loaded words we need to reclaim so that we can use it to name and illuminate the truth.... As Peggy McIntosh describes it, privilege exists when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they've done or failed to do. ... The existence of privilege doesn't mean I didn't do a good job, of course, or that I don't deserve credit for it. What it does mean is that I'm  also getting something that other people are denied... The ease of not being aware of privilege is an aspect of privilege itself, what some call "the luxury of obliviousness." - Allan G. Johnson, Privilege, Power, and Difference. P. 23-25

Instructions

1. Please identify one or two identity groups, from the list below, in which you have privilege. 

2. Reflect on situations listed for your identity. Take a few minutes and jot down your reflections to these questions: 

  • Reading the example of situations and thinking about my privilege, I felt .........
  • How does this kind of privilege show up in my actions (consciously or not) at work, in my community or in other settings?

3. Ask yourself. What might I do to be more aware of my privilege in my daily activities. 


Reflection Questions

  1. How might your experience as a white person differ from the experience of a person of color in: 
    • applying for a job?
    • passing police on the street?
    • preparing your child to go to school for the first time? 
  2. How might your experience as a cis heterosexual person differ from the experience of an LGBTQ person in: 
    • expressing affection, love and comfort in public?
    • preparing to introduce your partner to your family of origin?
    • participating in a lunch discussion at work on what you did this weekend? 
  3. How might your experience as a Christian differ from the experience of a Jew, Muslim, or Atheist in
    • testifying in court?
    • arranging time off at work to celebrate a religious holiday?
    • openly displaying religious symbols without fear of disapproval, violence, or vandalism? 
  4. How might your experience as an able-bodied person differ from the experience of a person with a disability in:
    • commuting to work each day?
    • negotiating where the annual work dinner is to be held?
    • how people interpret an expression of anger or frustration? 
  5. How might your experience as a man differ from the experience of a woman in: 
    • taking the car to a repair shop?
    • walking to your car after the store closed at night? 
    • reading your performance evaluation in which colleagues describe your performance as aggressive? 
  6. How might your experience as a professional wage earner differ from the experience of someone who is unemployed in: 
    • responding to school requests for supplies for your children? 
    • responding to old acquaintances who want to meet up for lunch? 
    • answering a want ad for a job 60 miles away?

*The content in in this blog post was created in collaboration with The Center for Assessment and Policy Development (CAPD), MP Associates and World Trust Educational Services, funded by The W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

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Topics: #WorldTrust, Racism, systemic inequity, bias, White Privilege, Unconscious Bias

21 Days of Justice with World Trust

Posted by Meriam Salem on December 11, 2018
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Topics: #givingjusticethatheals, Healing Justice, racial justice, trauma, restorative justice, systemic inequity, #WorldTrust, Talk about Race, System of Inequity, Diversity Workshops, White Privilege, Unconscious Bias

The Power of Restorative Justice Circles - Healing Justice Clip

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

In this clip from our film on the school-to-prison pipeline, Healing Justice, Ethan Viets-VanLier talks about the power of restorative justice circles:

To learn more about Healing Justice, click here.

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice

restoring interconnection to heal and prevent harm

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

In this moving clip from our film, Healing Justice, Harley Eagle explains how Dakota Nation community members work with those who have harmed others:

To learn more about Healing Justice, click here.

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice, restorative justice, school to prison pipeline

The Tinkerbell Story revisited

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

When we talk about social justice work, a lot of our time is spent focusing on the injustices that face our world today. The work feels urgent and never-ending, which can easily turn over into feelings of burnout and overwhelm. For many organizers, the work centers on what we choose to resist rather than building a vision for the future. We don’t get the opportunity to answer the important question: what comes next?

Healing Justice speaks the truth about the criminalization of young people of color, yet it also offers ideas for a future where young people are respected and have opportunities to heal.

A striking part of the film are the stories of vulnerability. During healing circles, attendees are invited to participate in ritual; artists create work that express their experiences of trauma and care; and community members find new ways to engage one another with transformative justice processes.

One of the most interesting examples in the film is the story of a victim whose car was stolen by a young person. You may have seen the clip already; it is one of the most popular stories fromt the film! In it, Sujatha Baliga, the Director of the Restorative Justice Project at Impact Justice, shares the story of a conference between that young person, the victim, and the victim’s friend:

 

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice

Tinkerbell and Restorative Justice

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

This clip from our film, Healing Justicedescribes in detail a successful restorative justice outcome. After every showing of the film we get lots of comments about how much viewers appreciated this "Tinkerbell" story! 

To learn more about Healing Justice, click here.

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice, restorative justice, tinkerbell

Sonya Shah on "behaviors" and original harm

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

How does a young girl react to trauma?

In this clip from our film, Healing Justice, Sonya Shah, Founding Director of the Ahisma Collective, talks about the implications and systemic consequences of "behaviors" that girls of color who have been exposed to trauma may exhibit:

To learn more about Healing Justice, click here.

 

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice

How to Build an Effective Discussion Group

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

You’ve watched the film. You’ve felt its impact. Now what?

Healing Justice can bring up a lot of emotions in its viewers – and it is meant to. As we talked about in our brief overview of transformative learning, emotional reactions create a valuable avenue for change. To channel those emotions into action, we encourage viewers to form a discussion group where all members have seen the film.

World Trust has created a free, downloadable conversation guide to accompany the film and support ongoing discussions around the criminal legal system, its history, and its effects on communities of color today. The film and guide help to organize your group discussions so that you can move from emotion and reaction into action.

group_hug.pngAll participants’ voices are valued, and through collaboration you will explore what role you can play in undoing racism and connecting with others as we work for a more just judicial system. As we have shared in past blog posts, internal work begins with ourselves and our close communities first and it is part of a collective educational, reckoning and healing process that supports mass change.

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice

Transformative Learning theory

Posted by World Trust Team on February 12, 2018

Our most recent film, Healing Justice, is grounded in transformative learning theory (like all of World Trust’s films and curricula).

This learning model was developed by Jack Mezirow, who described transformative learning as “learning that transforms problematic frames of reference to make them more inclusive, discriminating, reflective, open, and emotionally able to change.”

What does transformational learning look like in practice?

One short video breaks it down nicely.

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Topics: Talk about Race, #WorldTrust, nautilus, Healing, trauma, racial justice, Healing Justice